Mending Fences Animal Wellness
Educational Offerings
On-line Learning
Equine Anatomy & Physiology I - $375
On demand - open registration - 36 Hours of CE credits
through NCBTMB
This course was designed with body workers in mind,
but would be beneficial for anyone that rides or works
with horses. This course is on demand - you can start
at any time. It includes the following subjects:
  • Introduction to Anatomy
  • Cells and Tissues
  • The Skeletal System and Articulations
  • The Nervous System
  • The Muscular System - Physiology
  • Location, Origin, Insertion, and Kinesiology of
  • The Muscles of the Head, Neck, Back and Tail
  • The Muscles of the Thoracic Limb and Abdomen
  • The Muscles of the Pelvic Limb
Equine Anatomy & Physiology II - In Development

Anatomy of the Systems
Cardiovascular                Reproductive
Lymphatic                        Integumentary
Endocrine                        Urinary
Digestive                         Respiratory
Facilitated Movement for Dogs Taught by Theresa Gagnon

Dates: 4 Days  can be scheduled in 2 separate sessions  TBD

9am to 4pm with an hour for lunch.  Part 1 - 2 days
9am to 4pm with an hour for lunch.  Part 2 - 2 days
You can sign up for just Part 1 at $395 or all 4 days for $750

Facilitated Movement tm is a healing modality that encompasses and integrates several
healing entities. The basis for this work is garnered from Brain Therapy developed by Dr.
Barry R. Gillespie. Brain Therapy joins craniosacral therapy with TMJ-dental and fascial
bodywork techniques to allow the brain to move in its normal inherent motion.  Facilitated
Movement integrates Dr. Gillespie’s work with energy work and massage. It is a combination of
modalities that will facilitate the body to heal itself by initiating movement and thereby release
of restrictions in the fascial tissue.

In Part 1 (day 1 and 2), healing for the craniosacral system is addressed. The craniosacral
system includes the bones of the skull and vertebrae, the brain and spinal cord, the cranial
and spinal nerves, the meninges or connective tissue coverings and the cerebrospinal fluid.
Restriction in the fascia or connective tissue can place strain on the craniosacral system
resulting in impingement of cranial or spinal nerves or decreased flow of cerebrospinal fluid.
Facilitated Movement helps to release the restrictions creating balance in the tissues.

Day 1: Consists of morning lecture and afternoon of practicing techniques on each other. It is
difficult to feel structures and cranial rhythms on dogs - practice on people allows for
developing the feel and receiving feedback on your techniques.
Day 2: Review of the techniques, questions and answers. Practice on dogs.


In Part 2 (day 3 and 4), healing for the fascial system of the rest of the body is addressed.
Traditional anatomy books are based on dissections of numerous bodies. Anatomists have
looked at the skin and removed its attachments, superficial fascia. They have dissected away
the layers of fascia in order to gain access to the bones, organs and muscles below. It has not
been until more recent times that the fascia itself has ever been considered to be any more
than some tissue that gets in the way of looking at more important structures. In October of
2007, Harvard Medical School in Cambridge, MA hosted the first International Fascia
Conference. Researchers, osteopaths, medical doctors, PhDs, bodyworkers and
acupuncturists from all over the world came together to share innovative new information
about fascia. Some of the conclusions of studies have supported what fascial bodyworkers
have “known” for years.

1. That the fascia is comprised of myofibroblasts and has contractile properties similar to
smooth muscle (Schleip, Zorn, Lehmann-Horn, and Klingler).

2. That fascia is comprised of layers of collagen fibers with adipose in between that allow
layers to slide and move. This sliding mechanism can be altered and restricted by overuse,
trauma, or surgery (Stecco, Porzionato, and Gabelli).

3. That fascia contains free and encapsulated nerve endings, particularly Rufinni and Pacini
corpuscles, indicating that fascia plays a role in proprioception (Stecco, Porzionato, and
Gabelli).

4. That the structure of the collagen matrix of the dermis can be changed by manual
techniques in areas where patients have chronic pain or motion restrictions. The changes in
tension can be palpated before and after treatment and are thought to be caused by changes
in mechanical forces of fibroblasts (Pohl).

Day 1: Consists of morning lecture and afternoon practice on dogs.

Day 2: Practice on dogs, questions and answers. This may be only a half day depending on
the number of people and needs of the participants.
Equine Myofascial Massage Taught by Theresa Gagnon
Dates: TBD  2 Days  

9am to 4pm with an hour for lunch.
Educational investment $395

Healing for the fascial system is addressed. Traditional anatomy books are based on dissections of numerous bodies. Anatomists
have looked at the skin and removed its attachments, superficial fascia. They have dissected away the layers of fascia in order to gain
access to the bones, organs and muscles below. It has not been until more recent times that the fascia itself has ever been
considered to be any more than some tissue that gets in the way of looking at more important structures. In October of 2007, Harvard
Medical School in Cambridge, MA hosted the first International Fascia Conference. Researchers, osteopaths, medical doctors, PhDs,
bodyworkers and acupuncturists from all over the world came together to share innovative new information about fascia. Some of the
conclusions of studies have supported what fascial bodyworkers have “known” for years.

1. That the fascia is comprised of myofibroblasts and has contractile properties similar to smooth muscle (Schleip, Zorn, Lehmann-
Horn, and Klingler).

2. That fascia is comprised of layers of collagen fibers with adipose in between that allow layers to slide and move. This sliding
mechanism can be altered and restricted by overuse, trauma, or surgery (Stecco, Porzionato, and Gabelli).

3. That fascia contains free and encapsulated nerve endings, particularly Rufinni and Pacini corpuscles, indicating that fascia plays a
role in proprioception (Stecco, Porzionato, and Gabelli).

4. That the structure of the collagen matrix of the dermis can be changed by manual techniques in areas where patients have chronic
pain or motion restrictions. The changes in tension can be palpated before and after treatment and are thought to be caused by
changes in mechanical forces of fibroblasts (Pohl).

Day 1: Consists of morning lecture and demonstration and afternoon practice on horses.

Day 2: Practice on horses, questions and answers. Equine Postural and gait analysis.
Facilitated Movement ™ for Horses Taught by Theresa Gagnon
Dates: TBD 2 days

9am to 4pm with an hour for lunch.  
Educational investment:  $395

Facilitated Movement tm is a healing modality that encompasses and integrates several healing entities. The basis for this work is
garnered from Brain Therapy developed by Dr. Barry R. Gillespie. Brain Therapy joins craniosacral therapy with TMJ-dental and fascial
bodywork techniques to allow the brain to move in its normal inherent motion.  Facilitated Movement integrates Dr. Gillespie’s work with
energy work and massage. It is a combination of modalities that will facilitate the body to heal itself by initiating movement and thereby
release of restrictions in the fascial tissue.

Healing for the craniosacral system is addressed. The craniosacral system includes the bones of the skull and vertebrae, the brain and
spinal cord, the cranial and spinal nerves, the meninges or connective tissue coverings and the cerebrospinal fluid. Restriction in the
fascia or connective tissue can place strain on the craniosacral system resulting in impingement of cranial or spinal nerves or
decreased flow of cerebrospinal fluid. Facilitated Movement helps to release the restrictions creating balance in the tissues.

Day 1: Consists of morning lecture and afternoon of practicing techniques on each other. It is difficult to feel structures and cranial
rhythms on horses - practice on people allows for developing the feel and receiving feedback on your techniques.

Day 2: Review of the techniques, questions and answers. Practice on horses.